You want to vote

If your potential future leader was Daenerys Targaryen, you would register to vote, right?  I mean the leader of your city, your constituency, YOUR Member of Parliament (MP).  Someone you can actually vote directly for and go to with your problems and ideas.

Stuff trying to choose between Cameron and Miliband.  Boring!  And your vote has almost no chance of changing that as it depends on how people in the other 649 seats vote.

But if you could have an MP who would listen to you, vigorously defend your rights and challenge the government to do better – for YOU…  wouldn’t that be worth registering to vote and then casting your ballot for?

I plan to be that kind of MP.

I have no interest in politics for politic’s sake.  I’d much rather risk crashing and burning my political career trying to achieve a brave new world (no tuition fees, equal opportunities for all, fair taxation and benefits, an NHS with the resources it needs), than tip-toe around currying favour in the hope of a ministerial position, double my salary and getting a cushy pension.


On the 7th May 2015, you get your one and only say on central government of the UK in 5 years.  You can vote for your local councillors most years, but this year, it is a General Election.

It is time to choose the 650 MPs “representatives of the people” we want to sit in the House of Commons and decide policy for our country – how much tax to put on beer, hot food, cars, petrol, your income.  These people choose what it is important to spend your tax money on and what will be cut back.  They are responsible for ensuring you are safe from terrorists, climate change and free to live your life.

Most of the candidates you will see will be Party Candidates. Political parties such as Conservative, Labour, UKIP have a huge memberships.  They choose who will stand as their candidate for each seat, do much of their publicity and write the manifesto – what the party promises to do if elected (these promises do not have to be remotely possible, and they rarely keep them).

While most candidates are supported by a party, they are supposed to act for their constituents first.  I am standing as an Independent so that I never have to choose between what is best for the Party and what is best for you.

It is important that you can trust your local MP to put your best interests first.  All of our best interests first. Regardless of their party.

Once elected all MP’s sit in the House of Commons and vote on proposed changes to how our country is run, whether they are “in government” or not.

The party which wins the most seats forms the Government and appoints ministers, such as the Minster for Education and the Chancellor (who sets the budget).

If no party manages to get an overall majority, the biggest parties will try to form a team with smaller parties and the Independent MPs, until they have a team big enough to make a majority (as the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats did in 2010).

The Prime Minister is (strictly speaking) appointed by the Queen as the person who can command that majority team and be the leader of the government.


All you have to do, is to register to vote (here), and then choose the candidate who you believe will be the best.  

Your elected representative will be voting on your behalf on hundreds of issues over the next 5 years.  They need to be a good and strong person in their own right.

If you do not vote, nobody will never know who you thought would be the best and we will all be worse off for that.

What you think; matters. Please register to vote.

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Animal Rights, Animal Welfare & Cruel Sports

There are a number of great campaigns underway to ensure that we are talking about animal welfare and the status of cruel sports in the run up to the General Election in May 2015.  I am currently aware of at least three, from Compassion in World Farming, the International Fund for Animal Welfare and the League Against Cruel Sports.

I fully support all three of these campaigns, their requests are all very reasonable, well thought out and quite clearly the right thing to do in our modern, humane society. 

The League Against Cruel Sports outlines five calls:

1. To defend and strengthen the Hunting Act
2. To ban the use of snares
3. To conduct an independent inquiry into the commercial shooting industry
4. To take tough action to deal with illegal dog fighting
5. To strengthen protection for racing greyhounds

Further Information from the League Against Cruel Sports can be found here.

IFAW (International Fund for Animal Welfare) have asked all candidates to declare their stance on a number of key issues core to what IFAW stand for.  I completely agree with IFAW that:

Improving the welfare of animals is a top priority.

The UK should continue to lead international efforts to combat the illegal trade in endangered wildlife and wildlife products.

Commercial whaling should end.

The Hunting Act should remain in place.

Initiatives to better protect native wildlife species should be supported.

Further Information from the IFAW General Election campaign (and which other candidates agree with IFAW) can be found here.

The campaign from Compassion in World Farming is rather more in-depth and explicit.  I have been following Compassion in World Farming for many years and fully support everything they request in their charter (below).  I will campaign in parliament for it to be adopted 100%, and for us to come up with a sensible plan to make it become a reality from the less than ideal situation we have today.

I grew up in a farming village on the edge of the New Forest and have been inside a battery chicken house; it was horrendous.  But it wasn’t until I studied factory farming at Totton College that I realised just how widespread this miserable treatment of animals, especially pigs, is in our food production industry.  At that point I became vegetarian and vowed never to eat another battery egg.  I have kept to that since 1997.

We need to introduce high standards of farm animal welfare. It is time to phase out production that uses cages and crates as they thwart the basic instincts of many animals to roam, forage and explore.

Animals should be kept in outdoor systems or, if they are housed, they should be kept in large barns with ample space, plenty of straw, natural light and effective ventilation. Genetic selection for fast growth or high yields should be avoided if this results in compromised welfare and systems should not be used if they require mutilations.

Across Europe, around 700 million farm animals (hens, sows, rabbits, ducks and quail) spend some or all of their life confined in cramped, often barren cages.

Cages are a form of inescapable and extreme confinement which renders an animal dependent solely on its keeper for food and water, with minimal comfort, and deprives an animal of autonomy, severely restricting their ability to meet essential behavioural, physical and psychological needs.

It is for these reasons that cages should be consigned to the history books and food production should be developed using extensive, outdoor and cage free systems.

Sustainable farming that nourishes our health, the environment and promotes higher animal welfare must become the rule, not the exception.

Further information on Compassion in World Farming’s Charter can be found here: http://www.ciwf.org.uk/charter and here: http://www.ciwf.org.uk/charter-briefing-notes

I am similarly against industrial scale fishing, which is also both unsustainable and damaging to the environment and to the future of smaller, more environmentally responsible fishing operations (see Hugh’s fish fight from celebrity chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall).

Finally, I would like to draw your attention to the barbaric practise of culling badgers as an attempted method of reducing the risk of badgers transferring tuberculosis to cattle.  I say attempted because it is not very successful and is not supported by scientific evidence.  There is an alternative method, involving badger vaccination, which could be used instead, and would not require the widespread culling of wildlife.

For more information on the campaign against badger culling, please see here.

Where Suzie Ferguson stands on the TTIP

A lot of you have contacted me about the TTIP, thank you for that.  It is really encouraging to see how many people have their eyes and ears open now and are prepared to take action to show they will not stand for potential further privatisation of our public services and weakening of our democracy.

“The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) is a proposed free trade agreement between the European Union and the United States. Proponents say the agreement would result in multilateral economic growth,[1] while critics say it would increase corporate power and make it more difficult for governments to regulate markets for public benefit.[2] The American government considers the TTIP a companion agreement to the Trans-Pacific Partnership.[3] After a proposed draft was leaked in March 2014,[4] the European Commission launched a public consultation on a limited set of clauses and in January 2015 published parts of an overview.[5] 

Read more from Wikipedia on the TTIP here.

Groups such as 38 Degrees have been following the TTIP as closely as anyone and have warned that it could help speed up the privatisation of our services, the NHS in particular as well as giving corporations further powers to sue elected governments should they pass laws which hurt their profits.  The full text has not been made public, so it is difficult to verify either the positive of negative interpretations.

As a 38 Degrees member and concerned citizen myself, I have also been anxiously watching the progress of the TTIP.  I am hopeful that there must be something of value to the UK population in it, but so far, it seems as toxic as it comes. I am extremely against the idea of corporations having new powers to sue governments because this would make it difficult to reverse privatisation that has already taken place.  The fact that the NHS has not been removed from the TTIP despite the overwhelming public opposition is further evidence of how completely the wishes and ideals of the electorate have been ignored by our current government.

If I am elected I will lobby for complete rejection of the TTIP. If there is anything which would benefit the UK as a whole in there already, then let us take that forward in a new agreement and not waste everyone’s time and effort trying to unpick the current TTIP or placate the public by promising to remove “sections” only. I hope that MP’s will be given a chance to view the deal if it still exists in May, in which case I will communicate everything I can with you. If I am somehow prevented from doing this then I will pursue whistleblower protection so that I can communicate its contents.

It is important that the UK continues to further partnerships with our neighbours, but excluding defense and security issues, this should be done in a way that the electorate can interrogate, and preferably participate in, in a responsible and constructive manner.

Reversal of the creeping privatisation of the NHS in particular, which has been going on for at least 10 years, is something which I will make a top priority. All of the healthcare professionals, patients and general public I have spoken too, without exception, have stated that this would improve our NHS (along with hiring more medical professionals, on fair pay, ensuring they have the resources they need to do their jobs and matching the EU norms for total government healthcare spending).

Did you know that education has also been suffering from privatisation? Some heads of companies which run just a handful of schools earn twice the salary of the Prime Minister, regardless of how well or badly those schools are run, or how much the taxpayer is paying to support them? I will be standing for the reversal of this process as well.