You want to vote

If your potential future leader was Daenerys Targaryen, you would register to vote, right?  I mean the leader of your city, your constituency, YOUR Member of Parliament (MP).  Someone you can actually vote directly for and go to with your problems and ideas.

Stuff trying to choose between Cameron and Miliband.  Boring!  And your vote has almost no chance of changing that as it depends on how people in the other 649 seats vote.

But if you could have an MP who would listen to you, vigorously defend your rights and challenge the government to do better – for YOU…  wouldn’t that be worth registering to vote and then casting your ballot for?

I plan to be that kind of MP.

I have no interest in politics for politic’s sake.  I’d much rather risk crashing and burning my political career trying to achieve a brave new world (no tuition fees, equal opportunities for all, fair taxation and benefits, an NHS with the resources it needs), than tip-toe around currying favour in the hope of a ministerial position, double my salary and getting a cushy pension.


On the 7th May 2015, you get your one and only say on central government of the UK in 5 years.  You can vote for your local councillors most years, but this year, it is a General Election.

It is time to choose the 650 MPs “representatives of the people” we want to sit in the House of Commons and decide policy for our country – how much tax to put on beer, hot food, cars, petrol, your income.  These people choose what it is important to spend your tax money on and what will be cut back.  They are responsible for ensuring you are safe from terrorists, climate change and free to live your life.

Most of the candidates you will see will be Party Candidates. Political parties such as Conservative, Labour, UKIP have a huge memberships.  They choose who will stand as their candidate for each seat, do much of their publicity and write the manifesto – what the party promises to do if elected (these promises do not have to be remotely possible, and they rarely keep them).

While most candidates are supported by a party, they are supposed to act for their constituents first.  I am standing as an Independent so that I never have to choose between what is best for the Party and what is best for you.

It is important that you can trust your local MP to put your best interests first.  All of our best interests first. Regardless of their party.

Once elected all MP’s sit in the House of Commons and vote on proposed changes to how our country is run, whether they are “in government” or not.

The party which wins the most seats forms the Government and appoints ministers, such as the Minster for Education and the Chancellor (who sets the budget).

If no party manages to get an overall majority, the biggest parties will try to form a team with smaller parties and the Independent MPs, until they have a team big enough to make a majority (as the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats did in 2010).

The Prime Minister is (strictly speaking) appointed by the Queen as the person who can command that majority team and be the leader of the government.


All you have to do, is to register to vote (here), and then choose the candidate who you believe will be the best.  

Your elected representative will be voting on your behalf on hundreds of issues over the next 5 years.  They need to be a good and strong person in their own right.

If you do not vote, nobody will never know who you thought would be the best and we will all be worse off for that.

What you think; matters. Please register to vote.

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